March 19, 2014
by Elizabeth
2 Comments

911 Pigeon Rescue

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When the Good Samaritan arrived at my house on Friday night, he had two boxes taped shut with a total of ten pigeons inside. SFACC shelter staff had tried their best to persuade him to bring the birds to them the night before but nothing they said could convince him that they would help rather than kill the pigeons.

When we had spoken on the phone, I had offered to pick up the pigeons he was surrendering but he didn’t trust me either and wanted to see where they were going. I appreciate that concern and wish that more had it. Too often people blithely hand over their birds with very little knowledge of where they are going. But I was not at all happy that ten pigeons, including three sick squeakers squeezed in with angry adults, were in the small, filthy boxes.

And there were more. He had saved 20 King & Carneau pigeons from being killed as poultry and had set loose the other ten at a shopping center parking lot the night before. He had mistakenly assumed that because feral pigeons lived there, that these domestic pigeons would be alright. They weren’t. He realized almost immediately that he had made a mistake when he saw the pigeons being nearly run over by cars.

I quickly settled the seven adult pigeons in one foster cage and the three sick babies in a crate and then we drove to the parking lot to see if we could save any of the birds he had left there the night before.

We found and caught two and a third, with a broken wing, was rescued by one of several volunteers who had also searched to try and rescue these birds but seven are still unaccounted for and have most likely been killed by hawks if not run over.

We were already full up with 100 birds in foster care but these birds needed our help- immeditately. This was 911. And so now we have 113 birds in our care. The new birds include three fledglings- Daisy, Max and Sparrow. A big, old picked-on and sick adult I’ve named George (though I think she’s actually a hen), broke-wing, poor-appetite Hester (currently sitting in my lap after a hand-fed dinner), a pair of Carneaus I call Red Man & Lucy, and the others yet to be named. Each and every one of these birds clings to their aliveness as much as any other being. They are cheering up and getting better. We need foster homes and adopters for them and of course donations to sustain this work.

YOU saved these birds. MickaCoo is a manifestation of your support and involvement.

Thank you. Thank you for saving these innocents.

Elizabeth Young, founder & executive director

The pigeons were kept in the boxes for two days

The pigeons were in the boxes for two days

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Scared & miserable

Two "released" pigeons we were able to recover from the parking garage

Two “released” pigeons we were able to recover from the parking garage

The adults cheering up & feeling better already

The adults cheering up & feeling better already

Broke-wing Hester gets a wing-wrap from Dr. Gillespie

Broke-wing Hester gets a wing-wrap from Dr. Gillespie

Make a tax-deductible donation to MickaCoo

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March 18, 2014
by Elizabeth
5 Comments

Bubba’s Story

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Bubba

On February 22nd, I was doing a home visit in Fairfield and on my way to transfer pigeons in Vacaville when I got a voicemail from a caller with a Florida area code. I’m not always able to check messages and return calls so quickly but, when I did this time, I spoke to Dustin, stationed at nearby Travis Air Force Base, who told me he needed help for a pigeon he had rescued.

Dustin and his wife had been headed off base when he noticed that a pigeon was just standing in the road, being narrowly missed by the passing cars. Dustin pulled over and approached the pigeon. He knelt down and the bird took a step towards him and stopped. Dustin grabbed the pigeon up and took him home. He looked like a feral pigeon to the untrained eye and, with severely clipped wings, he was grounded. The bird was feather and bone, starved and dehydrated. Dustin had rescued lost and injured racing pigeons back home in Florida but they had bands that could be traced. Dustin contacted area shelters and rescues and publicized the found pigeon in an effort to return him to his person. Along the way, he was referred to MickaCoo and called me.

We were full up with 100 pigeons and doves in foster care and I spoke with Dustin about fostering the bird he had saved (if not adopting him outright) but, with a rescued dog (one of the many that are abandoned on Travis AFB) and a baby on the way, his wife had vetoed that idea. We arranged to meet in half an hour at The Nut Tree in Vacaville.

Dustin rescued Bubba

Dustin rescued Bubba

Dustin had saved Bubba’s life. He’s a tame Homer with the worst wing clip I have ever seen. It’s a miracle that he lived long enough on his own to get skinny.  I took him home to foster.

Bubba backseat driving on the way to my house

Bubba backseat driving on the way to my house

Safe from predators and with plenty of food and water, Bubba put on weight and began regaining his strength. His temperament was so sweet and demure (traits commonly found in Homer hens) that I initially thought Bubba was female but, when I took him outside to visit the aviary flock, they corrected me. Bubba enjoyed afternoons outside but spent most of his time recuperating indoors.

Bubba's private suite

Bubba’s private suite

Bubba visits the aviary flock

Bubba visits the aviary flock

I loved Bubba and hoped he’d enjoy working as a demo pij at meetings and events. When he had gained weight and was feeling good, I introduced him to pigeon pants and we did work a couple of events together.

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Bubba wears pigeon pants for the first time

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Bubba making new friends for pigeons at Community Initiatives

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Parrot Boomer checks out Bubba at a Mickaboo Adoption Fair

Comparing Bubba's Homer face to Coo Jackman's feral face

Comparing Bubba’s Homer face to Coo Jackman’s feral face. (CJ’s puffing out & showing off his throat.)

Bubba did great work as a demo pij but he didn’t love it. He was shy and tense and, when a rescued feral pigeon hen named Homie’s people were ready to adopt a mate for her, I introduced her to Bubba & young bachelor Ni-Ban.

Adina & Homie (photo courtesy of Adina)

Adina & Homie (photo courtesy of Adina)

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The custom-built aviary that clever-self-rescuer Homie inspired! L-R: Bubba, Homie, Snowflower, Ni-Ban, Moonshine

 

Homie took a shine to Bubba right away but it took him a day and a half to realize that he was in love.

Bubba & Homie are married

Bubba & Homie are married

And now, not only does Bubba have his beautiful and very clever wife Homie, but he has a wonderful forever home too. He has been adopted!

Domestic and unreleasable feral pigeons (like Homie) make great pets. Learn more about pigeons as pets.

Coming Soon: Homie’s Story!

 

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March 14, 2014
by Elizabeth
0 comments

Community@PigeonRescue.org

Everybody Needs Friends

Everybody Needs Friends

This famous photo of a lonely pigeon who befriended an orphaned rhesus macaque* speaks to the strength found in friendship. MickaCoo Pigeon & Dove Rescue also finds great strength in the support of our friends and together, we are doing what we could not alone. We are accomplishing life-saving and culture-changing work. And now we have a new tool with which to do it.

Long-time members may recall our old MickaCoo@Mickaboo.org E-mail group. We used it to post rescue and volunteer requests, ask questions and share insights amongst volunteers and adopters. In all the changes and challenges of our transition from being a department within Mickaboo to becoming our own independent rescue, it fell out of use, despite its value for communicating amongst ourselves.

I am very happy to announce that we are now launching a new E-mail group: Community@PigeonRescue.org and, if you’re a volunteer, foster care provider or adopter, we hope you will participate. (You can choose to receive E-mails in real time, as a once-daily digest or opt out at any time.)

To subscribe, please click here. And then, when you have a question or idea or assistance to offer in support of the birds we help and the people that love them, just send an E-mail to Community@PigeonRescue.org

Welcome Page

Welcome Page

Yay!!! We look forward to welcoming you to MickaCoo’s Volunteers & Adopters E-mail Group. It is thanks to your assistance- your time and talents and compassion- that we are able to comfort and save so many pigeons and doves in need. This group will allow us to communicate quickly & easily when birds need our help.

*To read the story called, “The Macaque and the Dove, check out Jennifer Holland’s book Unlikely Friendships.

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March 14, 2014
by Elizabeth
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MickaCoo Brings Pigeons & Doves to Bird Adoption

MickaCoo Pigeon & Dove Rescue once again had the pleasure of attending the Mickaboo Companion Bird Rescue Adoption Fair at the Carmichael Library. We had a wonderful day with lots of friends- new & old. Please visit www.PigeonRescue.org for more info about MickaCoo Pigeon & Dove Rescue (and www.Mickaboo.org to learn more about parrot rescue).

Please click on the photo to see full size with captions.

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March 8, 2014
by Elizabeth
6 Comments

Lovey Dovey Birdhouses

Guest Blog Post by Jean Getsi, Creator of Lovey Dovey Birdhouses

Jean has generously donated two Lovey Dovey Birdhouses to MickaCoo Pigeon & Dove Rescue to sell as fundraisers. $45 + shipping for each and all proceeds benefit MickaCoo! Comment below to buy yours.

Lovey Dovey Birdhouses

Lovey Dovey Birdhouses

Birds have always been a joy in my life and it’s great to share this excitement with others.

The first time I noticed pigeons on the roof of our house, I was 7 years old and it was a cool, crisp morning in March. The pigeons were cooing and spinning in circles, flying from the roof of our house to the roof of our garage and back. I was surprised to see the color variation. We had white pigeons, brown, black, gray and a various mix of colors.

I soon realized they were not afraid of us, and as my elder brothers and sisters would throw feed on the ground, the pigeons would fly down and feed within a foot or so of us. I was amazed at how tame these birds were and in awe of how beautiful they were. A year or so later a pigeon breeder came and took all the birds away saying that some of his birds were mixed with ours, and claimed all of our birds.

I missed these birds when they were gone, I missed the sounds the colors and their tame behavior.

Later when I was twelve years old a friend from school acquired a pigeon from someone he knew. He’s parents wanted him to get rid of the bird and it was probably the best thing for the bird. He used to tie a string around one of the bird’s feet and let it fly in circles. I couldn’t believe he didn’t see this as inhumane.

I took the pigeon home and instead of keeping it in a coop for two to three weeks to adjust to its new home. I kept it in a box for 24 hrs. The next day I let it fly outside. The bird flew off for an hour and returned, I decided to name him Boomerang, since he had returned so soon. I’m lucky he came back at all seeing how I’d had him for such a short period of time.

I had Boomerang for many years and was amazed at his tameness. My parents let me keep the pigeon in a small bird cage in our house and when I would let him outside, he would hover in front of the widows of the house until someone would let him in. Boomerang was so tame that I could go outside, stoop down to the ground with my hand out and he would walk to me.

In the years since, I’ve captured and released several pigeons. Some of these were stunned from being hit by cars. These usually took just a few days before releasing. Others had injured wings and took several weeks before they could be released. Today I have two pigeons in a small coop, Ruby & Ralph. Ruby lost part of her wing, possibly due to an encounter with a tree limb, and Ralph had been hit by the windshield of a car. The two are now mates. Neither can fly and they are not releasable.

Ruby & Ralph

Ruby & Ralph

Through the years I have enjoyed watching pigeons, doves, and every other bird under the sun. Birds have been such a blessing in my life, I can’t imagine how dull life would be without them.

I’ve made many types of bird houses in the past, and always looked with anticipation to see if the birds would take to the new homes I would build for them.

Doves love their Lovey Dovey Birdhouses

Doves love their Lovey Dovey Birdhouses

Over the past five years, I’ve been experimenting with an open bird house for doves and have found that doves too, will take to bird houses. I was delighted to see that the doves took to these dove houses so well, and decided to start building these dove houses and selling them online. For more information about the dove houses, please check us out at www.loveydoveybirdhouses.com

Dove Babies

Dove Babies at home in their Lovey Dovey Birdhouse

Thank you Elizabeth and MickaCoo for all your efforts in the rescue and rehoming of pigeons and doves.

Sincerely, Jean Getsi

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Thank you, Jean & Lovey Dovey Birdhouses for your generous support of MickaCoo Pigeon & Dove Rescue!

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March 6, 2014
by Elizabeth
0 comments

Friends of SFACC Grant Sustains MickaCoo’s Work

Thank You to Our Friends of SFACC!

Thank You to Our Friends of SFACC!

For the fifth straight year (and in the very nick of time), Friends of SFACC has awarded MickaCoo Pigeon & Dove Rescue a generous grant “for expenses related to the care and medical procedures for animals placed with our organization from San Francisco Animal Care & Control”.

In 2013, MickaCoo Pigeon & Dove Rescue cared for more than 40 birds from SF Animal Care & Control (SFACC), including 10 new intakes (all of whom were sick and/or special needs) and we also provided direct service to eight San Francisco residents to assist birds they found in distress (keeping them out of the shelter system). We also work to provide support to SFACC staff and volunteers in their care for birds being served by the shelter. (Please see Helping Animal Shelters to Help Pigeons & Doves to learn more.) 

When birds like Rumi, Gemini and Mighty & Minnie need help beyond what SFACC can offer, MickaCoo provides transportation, foster care, avian vet treatment and adoption service.

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Baby Rumi being picked up from SFACC

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Mighty & Minnie developed respiratory infections and needed rescue

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SFACC housed Gemini for 10 weeks & MickaCoo took him in when he needed more time

In August, SFACC director Rebecca Katz wrote about our partnership,

MickaCoo is one of the most committed and dedicated rescue groups with whom we have had the pleasure to work. In large part, through their efforts, we have a renewed appreciation for the unique character and needs of these birds coming into the shelter, especially in contrast to cats and dogs with which the general public has much greater familiarity.

Through our combined efforts, we are able to assess the medical, behavioral and social needs for the birds SF/ACC receives and every effort is made to put the bird up for adoption or transfer to rescue. With MickaCoo as a partner, hundreds of birds have been adopted into loving homes or serve as “ambassadors” at classes, outreach and other educational venues. The most rewarding outcome of MickaCoo’s involvement is that our pigeon and dove euthanasia figures have dropped significantly.

In their March Newsletter, Co-Presidents Jane Tobin and Lisa Stanziano write, “Each year, Friends of SFACC awards small grants to local rescue partners. This year, Friends was able to help 18 bay area rescue partners with grants totaling $49K. The award is based on the number of animals rescued from ACC in the past year (2013) and the finanical need of the organization.”

We are deeply grateful to the Friends of SFACC for their generous support. Thanks to their grant, we will be here ready to help birds that no one else can. We need more friends like Friends of SFACC!

MickaCoo Volunteer Cheryl at FSFACC' 20th Annual Pet Pride Day in SF

MickaCoo Volunteer Cheryl at FSFACC’ 20th Annual Pet Pride Day in SF

MickaCoo Pigeon & Dove Rescue provides direct service, both to shelters and citizens, in seven counties throughout the San Francisco Bay Area as well as education and referral assistance in support of birds all over the US and beyond. Please help us help birds by making a tax-deductible donation today. DONATE

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February 18, 2014
by Elizabeth
0 comments

Working Together: MickaCoo & The SF SPCA

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MickaCoo Pigeon & Dove Rescue got an awesome Valentine this year from The SF SPCA! They included us as a special guest both at their big, fun cocktail party on Thursday 2/13 as well as their Adoptathon on Saturday 2/15. We had a great time and made a lot of new friends for pigeons!

The SF SPCA is one of the biggest rescuers of dogs and cats in the Bay Area. They place about 5,000 animals in homes every year! As a big, well-established yet still innovative rescue with thousands of volunteers and supporters, The SF SPCA has tremendous reach and MickaCoo is eager to work together with such a strong partner on behalf of bird rescue.

While people are starting to get the message about adopting cats and dogs from shelters, they are way behind when it comes to recognizing the needs of birds (and other small, companion animals) in shelters. People are always surprised when I introduce them to the beautiful birds we rescue from shelters.

SFACC King 083013 Worthy of Life?

But MickaCoo is small! We have just one staff person, about 50 volunteers and about 400 donors.

And yet the work that we are doing is BIG! MickaCoo Pigeon & Dove Rescue was created to close a deadly gap in the SF Bay Area animal welfare community. When we started in 2007, all the other animals that wound up in the open door shelters- the cats, dogs, rabbits, parrots, reptiles, rodents, chickens and ducks, wildlife- everybody – had at least one rescue to help get them out alive when they ran out of time. Everybody except domestic (unreleasable) pigeons and doves. They stood in their cages, unnamed, unphotographed, unpublicized and unpromoted, and when their time was up, they were killed. But little MickaCoo has changed that and saved more than 600 birds’ lives (directly) since we started and helped countless more.

But we can’t keep up! Domestic pigeons and doves- bred and kept by fanciers, racers and hobbyists as well as poultry breeders- need help in numbers far greater than we can keep up with. Plus most folks don’t even know that they exist, nor that they need homes nor what amazing pets they make- either indoors with the family or outside in predator-proof aviaries.

MickaCoo is really excited to engage the compassion and expertise of  SF SPCA staff and volunteers on behalf of the birds! Stay tuned for new developments!

SF SPCA Co-President Dr. Scarlett discusses expanding to help "Smalls" like Valiant

SF SPCA Co-President Dr. Scarlett discusses expanding to help “Smalls” like Valiant

 

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February 11, 2014
by Elizabeth
7 Comments

WHY I TAKE CARE OF 27 PIGEONS

Guest Post by Linda Press Wulf

Ichiban & Mackenzie, April 2012

Ichiban & Mackenzie, April 2012

I was never very interested in birds. I love dogs, I dream of galloping on my own horse, I bonded with my future husband over rabbits, we have fostered kittens. But birds don’t have names, or personalities, or lovability. So I thought.

When I first signed up with a new rescue association for pigeons that could not be released into the wild, my reasons were hardly persuasive. The rescued rabbits that we kept for years in a huge aviary-style outdoor cage had finally gone to the Big Carrot in the Sky. The aviary was empty, wasting.

We were tired of rabbits, didn’t want chickens, and weren’t prepared to take on any time-consuming pets. Then I heard about Elizabeth Young, who had committed herself to saving king pigeons. Kings are bred for eating in restaurants, called squab on the menu, so their breast meat is disproportionately large. As a result, they are slow fliers and easy targets for hawks. When kind-hearted people see the beautiful huge white pigeons for sale at Vietnamese and Chinese markets and buy and release them with good intentions, the birds’ “freedom” lasts only a few days and their death is horrible. There are other pigeons too that cannot be released into the wild, such as racing pigeons and “wedding-release” homers that have become lost and are no longer wanted by their owners, as well as some feral pigeons with injuries or who have been raised indoors and then abandoned. Elizabeth formed MickaCoo to rescue these birds, trying to find people who would foster them for a while or adopt them permanently. And there I was, with an unused aviary.

I committed to fostering for a few months. I am still fostering three years later, with a changing group of twenty to twenty-seven birds in my care. Some of my friends think I’m crazy, or at least eccentric, but if they will listen, I explain that the pigeons have been, other than dogs, the most interesting pets I’ve ever had, and compared with my other pets, especially dogs, they are the least trouble. Most days, I spend less than three minutes in the cage, simply filling their food and water bowls. I check for eggs, apologizing guiltily as I sneakily remove real eggs and replace them with wooden look-a-likes. (There are too many pigeons in need of rescue, so offspring are a big mistake – called Oops Babies.) The wooden eggs are accepted with grace, and the pigeon couples sit on them patiently for weeks – alternating duties between dad during the day and mom at night – until they decide that location, location, location is the problem, and they move to another hutch and start again. Other days I spend some time hosing off the gravel on the ground or changing the newspaper in their hutches. On the best days, I just sit and watch them, endlessly fascinated by their behavior.

Pigeons mate for life. Their courting, which is recognizable after you’ve seen it once or twice, takes from a few minutes to a few weeks, and then that’s it – they are committed. Unlike humans, the strong and the good looking do not feel entitled to the cream of the crop: their mating choices are inexplicable, but once made, that’s it. The next step is to choose a hutch, win it against any competitors, and build a haphazard nest of straw or twigs. Then the pressure increases. Males spends a huge and hilarious amount of energy chasing their fertile mates back to the nest. No time to eat, or explore, or stretch legs. Round and round the aviary, he chases her, little legs pumping, efforts to “duke” or bob or weave persistently thwarted. With single-minded determination, he chases her to their nest. Finally an egg is laid, followed the next day by a second.

Animal behaviorists have shown that pigeons can recognize faces, can do tricks, can even be taught to play a form of ping pong. I find it more interesting to watch the way they “kiss” for long moments, a movement that is actually a preparation for feeding a baby bird mouth-to-mouth. To watch mates grooming each other. To hear the soft, calming coo-ing that seems generic at first, but eventually reveals the individuality of each pigeon’s voice.

Elizabeth can tell all the birds apart, but most of the big white ones look the same to me, and I usually have to check the colored bands on their legs or observe where they are nesting and who they are nuzzling. Mackenzie is the one I know best, because he was my first bird, along with an unnamed female, whom I called Ichiban, Number One in Japanese. When they suddenly decided many months later that they were going to be a couple, I watched Mackenzie’s self confidence grow until he was lording it over all newcomers, chasing any rude youngsters out of the cubbies next to and above and below his love nest. Two good years later, Ichiban developed a large lump that made her wing stick out crazily. The avian vet diagnosed a cancerous growth, and Mackenzie accompanied Ichiban to a volunteer with more medical knowledge than I have, and a much smaller aviary. He stayed close to his mate as she grew more and more lopsided. When Ichiban died, it took a while before he paid any attention to the three females placed in his little aviary to distract him. Tomorrow he is coming home to me with his second mate. His original cubby has been usurped in his absence but I know Mackenzie better than I ever thought I would know a bird. He will choose a new place, guard it against any trespassers, settle down into being a faithful husband, boss his wife unmercifully, and recognize my face.

The Wulf Foster Aviary

The Wulf Foster Aviary

Thank you to Linda and the Wulf Family for their loving and life-saving care of 76 foster pigeons since 2010!

If you’d like to become a much needed foster volunteer, whether for a couple or many, please go here for more information.

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January 30, 2014
by Elizabeth
1 Comment

Helping Animal Shelters to Help Pigeons & Doves

Young King pigeons at SFACC

Young King pigeons at SFACC

I’m sorry to say that the animal shelters in the San Francisco Bay Area used to routinely kill domestic (unreleasable) pigeons rather than place them with adopters. The birds weren’t named or socialized by volunteers, their profiles weren’t posted online, they weren’t included in outreach and adoption events. Not surprisingly, very few were adopted and so, when their time was up, they were killed.

I don’t believe that shelter staff ever want to kill anybody. It seemed to me that the open door shelters (which are the ones that accept pigeons and doves- most shelters turn them away altogether) struggle just to keep up with all the puppies and kittens, let alone find homes for pigeons. And there was no rescue organization to help the pigeons- despite all the pigeon breeders, fanciers, racers and hobbyists whose birds these were.

When I met my first shelter pigeon at SFACC in 2007, I was struck by this weird and fatal gap in the animal rescue network. All the other animals- the dogs and cats, the rabbits and the rats, the parrots and the reptiles, the chickens and the ducks, and the wild animals too- all had at least one rescue that might help them to leave the shelter alive. Many of the animals had multiple rescues as a safety net but domestic pigeons and doves had none.

I say weird because pigeons and doves wind up in open door animal shelters in significant numbers, more than parrots, more than reptiles. SFACC alone takes in more than 100 each year. Weird also because these are domestic birds- pigeons are arguably the first domesticated animal! If we are going to help all the other animals to find homes, why would we not do the same for pigeons & doves?

Spirit

Spirit

MickaCoo was created to close this deadly gap and, since we started six years ago, we’ve saved the lives of more than 600 birds (directly) and helped countless others. If we had more people-power and resources, we could be saving twice that many.

And that’s where the shelters come in. They do have people-power and resources! MickaCoo is very excited about the work that we do, not only to rescue and place birds ourselves, but helping Bay Area animal shelters to build their skills and abilities to better serve pigeons and doves.

MickaCoo offers free training to Bay Area animal shelters staff and volunteers.

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Berkeley Animal Care Shelter, March 2013

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Hayward ACC, May 2013

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Peninsula Humane Society, July 2013

MickaCoo helped SFACC to bring pigeons out of the back and into their busy lobby where lots of people can learn about these under-served birds.  And we are continuing to work on other shelters to do the same. (See Great Big News for the full story.)

SFACC’s Judy Choy with King pigeons Coco & Lemondrop

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The pigeons are their own best ambassadors

 MickaCoo of course brings pigeons & doves to shelter outreach and adoption events all over the Bay Area and we’ve inspired Peninsula Humane Society to do the same! (See more about all that PHS is doing for pigeons and doves here.)

SFACC Maddie's Adoptathon

SFACC Maddie’s Adoptathon

East Bay SPCA Adoptathon

East Bay SPCA Adoptathon

Marin Humane Society "Woofstock"

Marin Humane Society “Woofstock”

Peninsula Humane Society is the only other organization that regularly includes pigeons & doves in their outreach now

Peninsula Humane Society is the only other organization that regularly includes pigeons & doves in their outreach – so far

MickaCoo presents to the Bay Area shelters’ Humane Education students. 

Marin Humane Society Summer Campers

Marin Humane Society Summer Campers

Live Oak School

Live Oak School

One of the ways MickaCoo knows that we’re making a difference is that Bay Area shelters are beginning to include pigeons & doves in their media.

East Bay SPCA includes King Pigeon Peppermint in their sign

East Bay SPCA includes King Pigeon Peppermint in their sign

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PAWS for SJACS posts MickaCoo rescue of Avery to Facebook

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Marin Humane Society’s newsletter to 18K subscribers includes MickaCoo King pigeon

SFACC Holiday Cards include a dove

SFACC Holiday Cards include a dove

Jolly King Pigeon on SFACC's Facebook page

Jolly King Pigeon on SFACC’s Facebook page

And we are continuing to build the pigeon& dove serving capacity of shelters in innovative ways.  

MickaCoo-donated Aviary at MHS Generates Awareness with Visibility

MickaCoo-donated Aviary at MHS generates awareness through higher visibility

SF SPCA Co-President Dr. Scarlett discusses expanding to help "Smalls" like Valiant

SF SPCA Co-President Dr. Scarlett in talks with MickaCoo about expanding to help “Smalls” like Valiant

MickaCoo still has a long way to go but we are thrilled to be making progress not only in the rescue of individual birds but also in helping to build the capacity and the compassion of the animal welfare community.

One big problem that we hope to help remedy is the glaring absence of shelter services for birds in the South Bay/Silicon Valley. None of the shelters, not SJACS, SVACA nor the Humane Society of Silicon Valley, serve birds! If the birds aren’t taken in by rescue, they are killed.

Please support MickaCoo in the important work that we do. Please make a tax-deductible and life-saving donation today! Thank you!

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January 30, 2014
by Elizabeth
1 Comment

2014 Year of the Pigeon!

2014 Year of the Pigeon logo

You can well imagine how excited we were to receive this E-mail:

Hello MickaCoo!
 
Pigeon Monologues is planning a year-long campaign to make 2014 “The Year of the Pigeon” to spread awareness and raise funds for pigeon, rescue, care and rehabilitation. Our goal is to literally “feed those who feed the pigeons.”To kickstart the campaign we will be offering a special t-shirt for sale online and locally, which after covering costs and free shipping we expect to raise around $4 per shirt for our chosen non-profit organization. We will be adding to this fundraising effort by earmarking proceeds from sales of “The Pigeon Monologues” book via a store on our Facebook page – we think this will produce an additional $4–$5 per unit for our chosen non-profit. All in all, we think this will help make 2014 a great year for Pigeons.We’ve done a bit of research and think that MickaCoo would be a wonderful benefactor for the funds we raise. We hope that you would be interested in participating in this effort. We would be proud to aid your efforts to protect and save the lives of these very special birds. Please let us know – we look forward to hearing from you!
 
Sincerely,
Pigeon Monologues

Of course we said Yes!  Check it out! http://feedthepigeons.us/

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And when I asked how this fine idea came about, Warren Church, author of The Pigeon Monologues, had this to say:

It all started with observing pigeons in public squares when I travelled, taking pictures of them, admiring their unique abilities… and the fact that they survive or thrive at the courtesy of their environment. It was strange but I felt a certain connection with them (which is why we post on Facebook as Feral Rock Dove) – which led to jotting things in my notebook about what they might be thinking or saying. After a while I had a lot of photographs and a lot of notebooks – so friends encouraged me to create the book. In a way it was my tribute to these great birds… and after the book we’d seen some “Do Not Feed the Pigeons” signs while traveling, and when we got back we talked about how pathetic that is, and just the overall negative “brand” that pigeons have, and we thought it would be fun to try to counter that with a movement – declaring 2014 the Year of the Pigeon, and getting human signs – people with shirts – out there with a “feed the pigeons” statement felt right. We knew there were a lot of people out there who cared for pigeons, rescuing them , and we hit on ‘feeding those who feed the pigeons’ as our mantra. We made a short list of these places, and MickaCoo was easily at the top of that list – and we would love for this to become a larger movement and support other pigeon rescue organizations around the world. 
Indeed! I can think of quite a lot who would wholeheartedly agree! We are definitely going to make 2014 Year of the Pigeon!

 

Pigeon Love by Ingrid Taylar

Pigeon Love by Ingrid Taylar

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